Tag Archives: equality

Jonathan Myrick Daniels

The story of Jonathan Myrick Daniels is a tribute to social justice, to civil rights, and to equality of all people. His commitment to the work of Christ in our world, inspired by the words of the prophet Isaiah and the Virgin Mary, inspired him to live out his faith in radical ways for his time. His radical life of faith-inspired justice led to a tragic death, though in death, he has become a martyr for his faith, and therefore continues to inspire others by his brave witness. I find his story especially touching in light of the recent racial tension caused by the Travyon Martin case verdict, and also considering the recent repeal of the Voter Rights Act, which was enacted by President Johnson just two weeks before Jonathan’s murder.

Jonathan was born in Keene, New Hampshire, in 1939. He was shot and killed by an unemployed highway worker in Hayneville, Alabama, on August 20, 1965. From high school in Keene to graduate school at Harvard, Jonathan wrestled with the meaning of life and death and vocation. Attracted to medicine, the ordained ministry, law and writing, he found himself close to a loss of faith when his search was resolved by a profound conversion on Easter Day 1962 at the Church of the Advent in Boston, Massachusetts. In March 1965, the televised appeal of Martin Luther King, Jr. to come to Selma to secure for all citizens the right to vote drew Jonathan to a time and place where the nation’s racism and the Episcopal Church’s share in that inheritance were exposed.

jmd

He returned to seminary and asked leave to work in Selma where he would be sponsored by the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity. Conviction of his calling was deepened at Evening Prayer during the singing of the Magnificat: “‘He hath put down the mighty from their seat and hath exalted the humble and meek. He hath filled the hungry with good things.’ I knew that I must go to Selma. The Virgin’s song was to grow more and more dear to me in the weeks ahead.”

Jailed on August 14 for joining a picket line, Jonathan and his companions were unexpectedly released on August 20. Aware that they were in danger, four of them walked to a small store. As sixteen-year-old Ruby Sales reached the top step of the entrance, a man with a gun appeared, cursing her. Jonathan pulled her to one side to shield her from the unexpected threats. As a result, he was killed by a blast from the 12-gauge gun.

The letters and papers Jonathan left bear eloquent witness to the profound effect Selma had upon him. He writes,

The doctrine of the creeds, the enacted faith of the sacraments, were the essential preconditions of the experience itself. The faith with which I went to Selma has not changed: it has grown … I began to know in my bones and sinews that I had been truly baptized into the Lord’s death and resurrection … with them, the black men and white men, with all life, in him whose Name is above all the names that the races and the nations shout … We are indelibly and unspeakably one.

Jonathan-Daniels

O God of justice and compassion, you put down the proud and mighty from their place, and lift up the poor and the afflicted: We give you thanks for your faithful witness Jonathan Myrick Daniels, who, in the midst of injustice and violence, risked and gave his life for another; and we pray that we, following his example, may make no peace with oppression; through Jesus Christ the just one, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

–The below video provides more information about Jonathan Myrick Daniels’ life, and about his work for social justice in the segregated South:

Here Am I, Send Me: The Story of Jonathan Daniels from Episcopal Marketplace on Vimeo.

–Information in this post was excerpted from Holy Women, Holy Men: Celebrating the Saints, copyright 2010 by the Church Pension Fund.

Jonathan Myrick Daniels

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A Reflection on “The Way of the Cross – A Walk for Justice”

Today, on Good Friday, I observed the stations of the cross in a unique way. I attended an event that, for its sixteenth year, has marked the stations by reflecting on them through the lens of social justice today. The event, called “The Way of the Cross – A Walk for Justice”, is organized by a group of several Christian denominations (Catholic, Presbyterian, Episcopalian, Baptist, etc.), and walks the streets of downtown Louisville, Kentucky while stopping periodically to reflect on one of the sixteen stations.

The words of the stations reflect the passion in a way that the writers of each reflection approach the gospel call to care for the people of the world who are abandoned, abused, oppressed, or forgotten. The words are designed to create a sense of compassion and attention to those whom society easily forgets, but the words also call us to faithful responses to Jesus’s call to solidarity with all of God’s people and creation.

One station’s reflection that particularly spoke to me was the reflection for station VI, “Veronica wipes the face of Jesus.” I share this particularly moving reflection with you below:

A Reflection on the Suffering Caused by Inadequate Healthcare

Today Jesus is one of the working poor earning minimum wages without health insurance. He has heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, cancer, or HIV. And he is being denied the tests and treatments necessary to save his life.

Robert*, who is HIV+, developed cancer and needs a specific type of chemotherapy to treat his cancer. Manufacturers, putting profit before people, limit the amount of this chemo produced, and make it extremely expensive. If he had insurance paying for the treatments it would not be so bad. But Robert works for minimum wage, isn’t sick enough for disability assistance and has no health insurance. He can’t receive the treatments that would save his life.

It’s the same with the CAT scans he needs to monitor the spread of the cancer. Without health insurance his options are to pay 70% up front of the cost and get the scan in 2 weeks or wait 7 to 9 months if he can’t pay up front. In 7 months an undetected development could be fatal. The average cost of a CAT scan is $1500. For Robert, 70% up front (approximately $1050) would consume nearly six weeks’ total take home pay, and eliminate money for rent, utilities and food for his family.

Lack of healthcare means lack of life, while Wealth equals Health in our economic reality. Today we are called to be Veronica and offer comfort to Jesus by supporting healthcare justice for all people.

A prayer in response:
Loving Healer, you show yourself to those who are vulnerable.
You stayed in the homes of the poor, tired and weak of this world.
Give comfort to all who struggle to stay healthy and provide for all their needs.
Open the hearts of all the legislators who can help us.
Give courage to all who fight for justice and who are dying because of lack of good health care.
Unite us all as one as we fight the disease and fear of all who suffer from HIV/AIDS, poverty and inadequate health systems. AMEN.

*Name changed to protect privacy

Written by Jacqueline Aceto, SCN, and Celeste Anderson. Sr. Jacqueline’s community “The Sisters of Charity of Nazareth” serves the sick including those with HIV/AIDS in the U.S. and four other countries. Ms. Anderson is a counselor with AIDS Interfaith Ministries of Kentuckiana, INC (AIM).

Find out more about this event by reading this news article.

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Collect for Martin Luther King, Jr.

Almighty God, by the hand of Moses your servant you led your people out of slavery, and made them free at last: Grant that your Church, following the example of your prophet Martin Luther King, may resist oppression in the name of your love, and may secure for all your children the blessed liberty of the Gospel of Jesus Christ; who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

–Excerpted from Holy Women, Holy Men: Celebrating the Saints, copyright 2010 by the Church Pension Fund, p. 307

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